The Inspiring True Story Of A Prizewinning Foreign Correspondent Longing For A Child, Two Small Iraqi Children In Need Of A Mother, And What Love And Grief Can Teach Us About Family And Hope Zahra, Age Three, And Hawra, Only A Few Months Old, Were The Only Survivors Of A Missile Strike In Baghdad In 2003 That Killed Their Parents And Five Siblings Across The World, In London, Foreign Correspondent Hala Jaber Was Preparing To Head To Iraq To Cover The Emerging War After Ten Years Spent Trying To Conceive And Struggling With Fertility Problems, Jaber And Her Husband Had Finally Resigned Themselves To A Childless Future Now She Intended To Bury Her Grief In Her Work, With Some Unusually Dangerous Reporting Once In Iraq, Though, Jaber Found Herself Drawn Again And Again To Stories Of Mothers And Children, A Path That Led Her To An Iraqi Children S Hospital And To Zahra And Hawra And Their Heart Wrenching Story Almost Instantly Jaber Became Entwined In The Lives Of These Two Iraqi Children, And In A Struggle To Advocate On Their Behalf That Reveals Far About The Human Cost Of War Than Any News Bulletin Ever Could.Beautifully Written And Deeply Moving, The Flying Carpet Of Small Miracles Presents A Genuinely Fresh Insight And Perspective From A Woman Who, As An Arab Living And Working In The West, Is Able To Uniquely Straddle Both Worlds In Its Attention To The Emotional Experiences Of Women And Children Whose Lives Are Irrevocably Changed By War, Jaber S Story Offers Hope For Redemption For Those Caught In Its Cross Fires.


10 thoughts on “The Flying Carpet of Small Miracles

  1. Simona Simona says:

    Hala Jaber una giornalista, ma soprattutto una donna che si sente vuota per non aver mai avuto figli La bambina sul tappeto volante la testimonianza vera e tangibile di una giornalista, una donna che ha vissuto e vive da vicino la tragedia dell Iraq, la guerra irachena che continua a dilaniare molte famiglie Proprio i membri, le uniche sopravvissute, ovvero due bambine i cui nomi sono Zahra e Hawra, saranno il fulcro del suo viaggio e della sua missione Una missione che diventa sinonimo Hala Jaber una giornalista, ma soprattutto una donna che si sente vuota per non aver mai avuto...


  2. Amy Amy says:

    Written by a Muslim woman of Beirut, a journalist for the Sunday Times of London, married to a blond Brit photographer Her empathy for the families of war torn Iraq are heartbreaking I have admiration for her as a journalist, putting herself in danger again and again But wonder how she could have held a 3 month old baby, considered it to be hers, and then ignored it for 6 years The explanation of dealing with the guilt and grief of loosing the 3 year old sister after only six months was not Written by a Muslim woman of Beirut, a journalist for the Sunday Times of London, married to a blond Brit photographer Her empathy for the families of war torn Iraq are heartbreaking I have admiration for her as a journalist, putting herself in danger again and again But wonder how she could have held a 3 month old baby, considered it to be hers, and then ignored it for 6 years The explanation of...


  3. Gloria Gloria says:

    I enjoyed this book It s a non fiction account of Hala Jaber who was a journalist that worked with her husband in Iraq It tells of her disappiontment in not having children of her own and becoming attached ...


  4. Leigh Leigh says:

    informative in some respects but annoying It was mistitled and not a woman s fight to save two orphans at all.


  5. Jenny Jenny says:

    very interesting read so far.quite heartbreaking.finished this 26th April further thoughts to follow


  6. Aysha Ziyad Aysha Ziyad says:

    A story of an infertile female set in the war zones of Iraq For someone who has read on what accompanies war this might be a bit of a bore But otherwise, the author brings out a story of loss, coping and acceptance It was also a quick and easy read.


  7. Bookwitch2016 Bookwitch2016 says:

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  8. Dhali Dhali says:

    Several years ago I read Salam Pax the book version of a blog written by an Iraqi man about the realities of living in Baghad as it was waiting to be, and then being, bombed It was a horrific, and at time even witty, account of the human cost of war This book is another excellent account of the price war extracts from civilians written by somewhere who was there Jaber s descriptions of the destruction to life, property and country are surprisingly neutral and all theeffective for Several years ago I read Salam Pax the book version of a blog written by an Iraqi man about the realities of living in Baghad as it was waiting to be, and then being, bombed It was a horrific, and at time even witty, account of the human cost of war This book is another excellent account of the price war extracts from civilians written by somewhere who was there Jaber s descriptions of the destruction to life, property and country are surprisingly neutral and all theeffective for that What the average Baghdadi who didn t have her protection and privileges as a Western journalist suffered doesn t bear thinking about Except that Jaber makes us face it She writes of pregnant women crowding hospitals in the weeks and days before the bombing, wanting to have their babies induced to avoid the risk of going into labour later when the electricity is out or a bridge or the hospital bombed She writes of children with horrific injuries and of whole families destroyed in an instant At one poi...


  9. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    This book wasn t on my to read list, but I saw it on the shelf at the library a few weeks ago and it ended up coming home with me I have a heart for adoption and absolutely love hearing reading adoption stories so I thought this would be another uplifting, inspirational, happily ever after kind of read It wasn t Yes, this is the story of Hala Jaber s attempt to rescue two orphans from war torn Iraq, butthan that it s an insider s look at the harsh reality of war and the effects of w This book wasn t on my to read list, but I saw it on the shelf at the library a few weeks ago and it ended up coming home with me I have a heart for adoption and absolutely love hearing reading adoption stories so I thought this would be another uplifting, inspirational, happily ever after kind of read It wasn t Yes, this is the story of Hala Jaber s attempt to rescue two orphans from war torn Iraq, butthan that it s an insider s look at the harsh reality of war and the effects of war on women, children and the elderly I was absolutely captivated by the first nine chapters They broke my heart, they challenged my conservative Republican perspective on war and they...


  10. Aban (Aby) Aban (Aby) says:

    I learned about this book through a CBC radio interview with the author, and was eager to read it I wasn t disappointed.Jaber is a British Lebanese journalist, married to an Englishman, who works for The Sunday Times as a foreign correspondent Together with her husband, she went to Bagdad to cover the war in Iraq The book is about her experiences there, with the focus on two sisters, Zahra, three years, and Hawra, a baby, at the time when a missile killed their parents and five siblings Za I learned about this book through a CBC radio interview with the author, and was eager to read it I wasn t disappointed.Jaber is a British Lebanese journalist, married to an Englishman, who works for The Sunday Times as a foreign correspondent Together with her husband, she went to Bagdad to cover the war in Iraq The book is about her experiences there, with the focus on two sisters, Zahra, three years, and Hawra, a baby, at the time when a missile killed their parents and five siblings Zahra was badly burned, though Hawra was unharmed Deeply moved by the plight of the little ones, Jaber was eager to adopt them, as she was unable to have children of her own The book covers the following five years, as Jaber struggles to help the children and the grandmother who looks after them.The book has many interesting themes the devestation caused by war on innocent civilians something not covered in any depth by our media the heartache of women who are unable to concieve a chil...